Electrifying Unpowered Dams

DANGEROUS DECOMMISSIONED DAMS

Around the world, some 5,000 large dams are now more than 50 years old, and the number and size of the dams reaching their half century is rapidly increasing. The average age of dams in the US is now around 40 years. According to a panel on dam aging at ICOLD’s 1991 Congress, “in the future attention and activity [will] be more and more shifted from the design and construction of new dams to the restoration of the structural and operational safety of existing dams”.  Many of these are decommissioned dams.

Dangerous dams, however, are far from purely a problem of the ex–Soviet republics. Between 1977 and 1982 the Corps of Engineers inspected 8,800 non–federal dams in the US, most of them privately–owned, which it classified as “high–hazard” – where a failure could cause significant loss of life. One–third of these dams – 2,900 – were considered to be “unsafe”, primarily because of inadequate spillway capacity. A 1994 survey showed at least 1,800 non–federal dams were still unsafe. The situation is similar for federal dams: in 1987 one–fifth of BuRec’s 275 dams were classified as unsafe, as were one–third of the 554 dams operated by the Corps of Engineers.

An Ontario Hydro study of data from several hundred North American dams shows that on average hydro dam operating costs rise dramatically after around 25–35 years of operation due to the increasing need for repairs. When the cost of maintaining an old dam exceeds the receipts from power sales, its owners must decide either to invest in rehabilitating the dam, or, if the cost of repairs would be prohibitive, to disconnect the dam from the grid and cease producing power.

 As discussed, small dams and small dam owners collectively, represent as great a risk to the public as large dams and large dam owners, if not more so.

 

Dams Purpose US
Dams Purpose US

Preliminary estimates indicate that by 2030,  from 2% to 15% of the nation’s electricity could come from water power – including hydro power and marine and hydro kinetic energy sources, such as waves and tides.

 

New Hydropower Resources: Non-Powered Dams
New Hydropower Resources: Non-Powered Dams
New Hydropower Resources: Non-Powered Dams
New Hydropower Resources: Non-Powered Dams

The highest potential among all the states was found largely in the western U.S.—Washington, Idaho, Alaska, Oregon, Montana, Colorado, and California—with Kansas, Wyoming, Missouri, and Pennsylvania, leading the rest of the country. Among the top 100 candidates for hydropower development at identified NPDs, 81 are US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects.

Summary of Non-powered Dam Hydro Power Potential   by Federal Agency

 

Federal Agency NPDs located on land owned by agencies NPDs owned/operated by agencies
# of NPDs MW # of NPDs MW
US Army Corps of Engineers 121 517.1 373 8241.6
Bureau of Reclamation 191 268.3

The Corps report identifies more than 220 non-powered sites for potential hydroelectric power development. Continue reading Electrifying Unpowered Dams

California, Catch the Next Big Energy Wave

California  Wave Energy

 

OCEAN WAVE ENERGY
OCEAN WAVE ENERGY

Renewable energy companies are increasingly interested in converting the energy of California’s ocean waters into electricity. Wave Energy Conversion Technology is evolving and the need for renewable energy is clear.

 

California Wave Energy
California Wave Energy

Since California is one of the most fossil fuel dependent states in the world, any alternatives are worth investigating. 

California Gov. Brown said California emits 12 tons of carbon dioxide a year for every resident and it  has to get that down to two. “This is big,” he said.

Ontario’s greenhouse-gas emissions are emitting about 12.5 tons of carbon dioxide a year/per person.

 

Smog California
Smog California

Members of the California Nurses Association march to a rally outside the hearing in Sacramento.

 

Clean Air is a Human Right
Clean Air is a Human Right

Protecting Lives and Lungs From Smog

An estimated 230,000 missed days of school and 210,000 asthma attacks would be avoided. Cleaner air is also good for our pocketbooks and could yield an annual health benefit of up to $4 billion by reducing medical costs that come from emergency room visits and expenses for treating smog-related illnesses.

 

 The reason for an array of serious health impacts, including bronchitis, asthma attacks, emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and premature deaths.
The reason for an array of serious health impacts, including bronchitis, asthma attacks, emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and premature deaths.

Continue reading California, Catch the Next Big Energy Wave