Category Archives: HUG Kinetic Energy

Hawaii Wave Energy

The Hawaii Wave Energy PotentialHUG Wave Energy

The HUG Hawaii  Wave Energy is a game changer. It promises to bring electricity created from ocean wave energy to the ocean shores of Hawaii at a very low cost.

Hawaii would seem a natural site for such technology. As any surfer can tell you, it is blessed with powerful waves. The island state also has the nation’s highest electricity costs—largely because of its heavy reliance on oil delivered by sea—and has a legislative mandate to get 100 percent of its energy from renewables by 2045.

The following images are located along the  coast of Hawaii wherever there is a natural small bay. This type of topography reduces the cost of the reservoir.

 

Hawaii Wave Energy
Hawaii Wave Energy: Kalihiwai
Hawaii Wave Energy
Hawaii Wave Energy: Pupukea
Hawaii Wave Energy
Hawaii Wave Energy: Honolua Bay
Hawaii Wave Energy
Hawaii Wave Energy: near Maliko Bay

HUG Wave Energy Now enter a new use which is more profitable: the creation of electricity. Now it makes sense to spend over $25 million on the project because of a very lucrative return on investments: 19%/year in first year to 105%/year thereafter.

THINKING “OUT OF THE BOX” Continue reading Hawaii Wave Energy

Untapped Hydro Resources

Untapped Hydro Resources

Hydro power once averaged over 20% of U.S. electric power sector net generation in 1970. Over the past decade (2004–2013), hydro power provided an average of 6.8% of U.S. electric power sector net generation. Untapped non-power dam (NPD) resources  will transform small hydro into a major energy source.

The U.S. Administration’s goal is to generate 80% of the nation’s electricity to clean energy sources by 2035 and lead the world in clean energy innovation.

The hydro power resource assessment by the Department of Energy’s Hydropower Program has identified 5,677 sites in the United States with acceptable undeveloped hydro power potential. These sites have a modeled undeveloped capacity of about 30,000 MW. This represents about 40 percent of the existing conventional hydro power capacity.

The 80,000+ non-powered facilities represent the vast majority of dams in the country; more than 90% of dams are used for services, such as regulating water supply and controlling inland navigation, and lack electricity-generating equipment.

non powered dams

An assessment of energy potential from new stream-reach development in the United States led by DOE’s ORNL provides a national picture of the remaining new hydropower development opportunities in U.S. rivers and streams. The assessment concluded that the technical resource potential is 85 GW of capacity. When federally protected lands—national parks, national wild and scenic rivers, and wilderness areas—are excluded, the remaining potential is over 60 GW of capacity or 347 TWh/year of generation.

Power stations can likely be added to many of these dams at a lower cost than creating new powered dam structures. Together, these non-power dam (NPD) facilities could power millions of households and avoid millions of metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year.
undeveloped hydroelectric power

Only 3 percent of the nation’s 80,000 dams currently generate electricity, and as we move to a clean energy economy, it is vital that we tap these unused resources. Continue reading Untapped Hydro Resources

Spur Dikes & Rock Vanes

Spur Dikes increase Kinetic Energy


Malawi Kinetic Energy HUGConstructed rocky shoals are used to divert water away from the bank and build a concentrated faster flow.  Spur dikes or rock vanes are used to narrow a widened channel of rapids in order to increase the velocity of the flow. Rock and stone walls are less costly than concrete walls.

Why increase the Velocity of the Flow?

Let’s look outside the box.

Rome in a Box

Is there a better way to increase the velocity of the flow and thereby reduce the size of the system by a factor of eight?
The HUG adds over three times the increase of velocity created from its Vortex. The turbine’s power is proportional to the cube of its average velocity. Thus, a doubling of the average speed of the flow results in an eight-fold increase in its power, which results in the lowest cost: $0.01/kWh.
The resulting kinetic energy (KE) would be increased by a power of three: v³ to 6³/2³or 27 times. The 4 knot (2 m/sec) current becomes 6 m/sec in the HUG and the KE increases from 50 kW to 1350 kW for 20,000 homes instead of 500 homes.
{KE (Kinetic Energy) = .5 x Area x v³ x .35 (efficiency)}
The HUG can be configured in arrays of much larger capacity – potentially hundreds of megawatts.

Here is a big bonus.

You have to go through 20 to 25 different regulatory agencies in this country. The HUG Energy System acts in the form not unlike that of a boat, which requires little environmental regulations.

TAP THE VORTEX

OTHER IMPORTANT LINKS

  1. An Irrigation System: NORTHydro.com
  2. A Rabbit and Fish Farm: AfriCAPITALISM.us
  3. An Agroforestry Intercrop System: LivingWaterIs.com
  4. The Charitable Arm: SunnyUp.net
  5. God’s Loveletters:  Godloveletters.com
  6. Thunder of Justice: ThunderofJustice.com
  7. Microfinance for womenLivingWaterMicroFinance.org
  8. Deliverance Is: DeliveranceIs.com

https://twitter.com/roaudet

Kipawa Hydro Reservoir

The Kipawa Hydro Reservoir

This large Ottawa River reservoir, built by the Canadian government at the beginning of the last century, is already more than sufficient to add a full-time 70 MW power plant but it would significantly impact the environment. Developed by the Kipawa Reservoir community, this project would be by far the most profitable in Quebec at this time, and would provide a return on investment within just a few years.

Kipawa Hydro HUG

The 132 MW Tabaret project will eliminate the aquatic ecosystem of the Kipawa River to replace and unused 17 MW Unit and a 5 MW plant.

There are other, smarter and more reasonable options for producing hydro power on the Kipawa watershed: the HUG Hydro System. There are two approaches: one uses kinetic energy of moving water of the rapids and the second use the energy of gravity from small waterfalls.

 

Kipawa Hydro HUG Kipawa Hydro HUG Kipawa Hydro HUG Continue reading Kipawa Hydro Reservoir

TAP THE VORTEX

To Tap the Vortex for Hydro Power

A good place to start to create energy from the tides is in the Bay of Fundy where there is one of the highest tides in the world in order to tap its Vortex.

As usual it took an inordinate amount of time to raise the initial amount of investments mostly from various government bodies from both Canada and United States. Then the predictable came true, the propellers of the turbine system failed. Risks can be expected when working in entirely unfamiliar environments. Then, there is more time wasted trying to raise funds for a different type of blade.  

We are talking about a five-story turbine that weighs 400 tons for a 35 kW turbine. Size and weight has become the problem. The cost of the power sky rockets to $0.53/kWh compared to the current average of $0.06/kWh.

hydro tidal turbine

OpenHydro and Nova Scotia Power

So how does these “innovations” start? It starts with a minimum requirement of one megawatt. The formula for kinetic energy dictates how big this system has to be, which is humongous. Think of the maintenance problems if these huge systems were on land, and then double the problem under deep water. 

Researchers at the Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute (KORDI) chose the site because it has flows up to 12 knots between islands at Uldolmok. Again the unexpected happened: the installation time was miscalculated and a 1000 ton system on a barge capsized, which caused a two year delay.

Kordi Korea Helical Turbine

There is an important reason why a large engineering company (Boeing) walked away from commercializing the R.E.R 250 kW hydro turbine system costing $130 million Canadian, which was tested at the Lachine Rapids near Montreal: maintenance. Bankruptcy was declared at losses of $49 million.

Lachine Rapids turbine Continue reading TAP THE VORTEX

TRUE ENERGY TRANSFORMATION

How can we deliver true energy transformation to the world?

“An investment in a true energy transformation requires governments, research institutions, businesses, and private investors to work together.”


imperative action needed

The world is going to be using 50 percent more energy by mid-century than it does today.

Bill Gates, the co-founder of Microsoft, has emerged as a force for innovation:  “No Investor or group of investors can do this alone. Breakthrough Energy is committed to encouraging a broad network of public and private capital to work together to solve the problem. An investment in a true energy transformation requires governments, research institutions, businesses, and private investors to work together.”

“The Breakthrough Energy Coalition created BEV to address some of those challenges in the energy market. We are willing to wait a longer time for returns than other funds. Finally, the fund is committed to discovering breakthroughs, wherever they are.” 

“We must stop looking for business plans and look instead at the innovation after all it is the innovation and not how the owner of the IP will run a business which will stop CO2 emissions.”

https://www.gatesnotes.com/Energy/Breakthrough-Energy-Ventures

The HUG: a True Energy Transformation

Which renewable energy source has the most potential?

  1. The HUG is feasible, renewable and clean alternative for low cost power production.  An estimated 10 million people live mostly in urban areas along the banks of the river in any under developed country.hug energy system hug energy system
  1. Only 3 percent of the nation’s 80,000 dams currently generate power. An Energy Department-funded study found that 12,000 megawatts of hydroelectric generating capacity could be added to existing dams around the country.

The HUG System

Continue reading TRUE ENERGY TRANSFORMATION

KINETIC HYDRO POWER

micro hydro power

KINETIC HYDRO POWER

 Kinetic hydro power is dam-less hydro power that is converted from energy found in the flowing water currents of oceans, tides, rivers and man-made channels or conduits. Free Flow systems are turnkey renewable energy solutions that employ underwater turbines to generate electricity from the natural water currents. The systems do not require dams, impoundments or major civil works. They operate automatically, fully underwater and invisible from shore.

HUG Pump systemHUG Helical Turbine System

White River

The Ojibways of the Pic River First Nations have just announced their intention to build a 25 to 30 MW Installed Capacity hydroelectric facility at Chigamiwinigum Falls, on the White River, in Pukaskwa National Park.   The project would cost in excess of a $100.0 million dollars.

white river cascade Pukaskwa National Park

The HUG Energy System would produce the same power at a fraction of the cost because there are no expensive civil works.

Ottawa Rivercalumet rapids narrows

calumet narrows

Chute-du-Grand-Calumet:  30 m narrows at island above (Near Rte 148, Bryson, QC) 

The main current  of the Ottawa River at this point is constricted to 30 m, which produce a very fast velocity of its deep flow.

Continue reading KINETIC HYDRO POWER