Tag Archives: California

Electrified Vehicles: Battery or Hydrogen

GOOD WORD FOR THE ELECTRIC CAR

Over the next 30 years we will see automobiles fully electrify. Gas emissions produced by traditional cars are poisoning the air that we breathe: in big cities the situation is critical. We need to change, and electrified vehicles is the solution. But which one: Battery or Hydrogen?

electrified vehicle


Electric cars future

Energy efficient, battery-powered cars will, by 2025, be cheaper to buy than conventional, gasoline-powered cars.

Bloomberg New Energy Finance recently reported that the price of the zero emission cars is largely due to falling battery costs. The report says that “batteries currently account for about half the cost of EVs, and their prices will fall by about 77 percent between 2016 and 2030.”

Automaker Renault predicts ownership costs of electric vehicles will, by the early 2020s, equal that of conventional gas-powered vehicles.

The report also noted that by 2025 14% of new car sales, or 100 million electric cars globally, will be electric vehicles.

For fleet operators, this is good news. In 2014, greencarreports.com reported that electric vehicle fleets could save operators an average of $16,000 each, compared to the traditional vehicles over a service life of seven years. Now, the cost savings is clearly larger.

One of the challenges, however, with electric vehicles is total energy demand. The energy demand created by fully charging an electric vehicle (EV) can be as high as total domestic electricity consumption for one household, albeit more concentrated over particular periods of the day as well as geographical areas.

The latest study by McKinsey* et al (Electrifying insights: How automakers can drive electrified vehicle sales and profitability) claim around 2030 or so, EVs will be price competitive with conventional cars, which was based on sound data. 

Electrified Vehicles

The report states that consumer demand is starting to shift in favor of slightly. While more than 20 per cent of new car shoppers think about buying a new battery-powered electric car, less than 0.5 per cent actually does buy.

There is still a battery barrier.

The 2016 estimated pack cost of ~$227/kWh means that a 60 kWh battery becomes a $13,600 component of the car. We may have to wait between 2025 and 2030, when battery pack costs fall below $100/kWh, creating financial headwinds for Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV) automakers.  That’s a cost saving of $5,000 per car. 

Relying on increasingly large lithium ion batteries to assuage range anxiety is not a practical long-term solution to eliminating greenhouse gases. Electric-powered automobiles are not a bad idea; pure battery-powered BEVs are a bad idea.

electrified vehicles

It’s going to take more than just cheap lithium ion to bring about the end of the internal combustion engine.  Building an infrastructure to service this type of technology when there are quicker and more efficient recharging models available is a monumental waste of money.

Electric cars future

Hydrogen vs. Electric: Which is actually more efficient?

Continue reading Electrified Vehicles: Battery or Hydrogen

California Canyon Wave Energy

HUG Wave EnergyCalifornia Canyon Wave Energy 

The HUG California Canyon Wave Energy is a game changer. It promises to bring electricity created from ocean wave energy from the canyons of the shores of California at a very low cost.

 

California Canyon Wave Energy
California Canyon Wave Energy: Monterey
California Canyon Wave Energy
California Canyon Wave Energy: Santa Barbara
California Canyon Wave Energy
California Canyon Wave Energy: Moss Landing
California Canyon Wave Energy
California Canyon Wave Energy: Cape Mendocino

HUG Wave Energy Now enter a new use which is more profitable: the creation of electricity. Now it makes sense to spend over $25 million on the project because of a very lucrative return on investments: 19%/year in first year to 105%/year thereafter.

THINKING “OUT OF THE BOX” Continue reading California Canyon Wave Energy

CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY

The California Wave Energy Potential

HUG Wave Energy

The HUG California Wave Energy is a game changer. It promises to bring electricity created from ocean wave energy to the ocean shores of California at a very low cost.

The following images are located along the coast wherever there is a natural small bay. This type of topography reduces the cost of the reservoir.

 

California Ocean Wave Energy
California Ocean Wave Energy: Caspar
California Ocean Wave Energy
California Ocean Wave Energy: Seahaven Inverness Miller
California Ocean Wave Energy
California Ocean Wave Energy: Klamath Mountains
California Ocean Wave Energy
California Ocean Wave Energy: Stewarts Point

HUG Wave Energy Now enter a new use which is more profitable: the creation of electricity. Now it makes sense to spend over $25 million on the project because of a very lucrative return on investments: 19%/year in first year to 105%/year thereafter.

THINKING “OUT OF THE BOX” Continue reading CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY

California, Catch the Next Big Energy Wave

California  Wave Energy

 

OCEAN WAVE ENERGY
OCEAN WAVE ENERGY

Renewable energy companies are increasingly interested in converting the energy of California’s ocean waters into electricity. Wave Energy Conversion Technology is evolving and the need for renewable energy is clear.

 

California Wave Energy
California Wave Energy

Since California is one of the most fossil fuel dependent states in the world, any alternatives are worth investigating. 

California Gov. Brown said California emits 12 tons of carbon dioxide a year for every resident and it  has to get that down to two. “This is big,” he said.

Ontario’s greenhouse-gas emissions are emitting about 12.5 tons of carbon dioxide a year/per person.

 

Smog California
Smog California

Members of the California Nurses Association march to a rally outside the hearing in Sacramento.

 

Clean Air is a Human Right
Clean Air is a Human Right

Protecting Lives and Lungs From Smog

An estimated 230,000 missed days of school and 210,000 asthma attacks would be avoided. Cleaner air is also good for our pocketbooks and could yield an annual health benefit of up to $4 billion by reducing medical costs that come from emergency room visits and expenses for treating smog-related illnesses.

 

 The reason for an array of serious health impacts, including bronchitis, asthma attacks, emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and premature deaths.
The reason for an array of serious health impacts, including bronchitis, asthma attacks, emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and premature deaths.

Continue reading California, Catch the Next Big Energy Wave