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HAITI WATER RESOURCES SOLVED

Water resources in Haiti are a major concern.

The lack of adequate safe (potable) water supplies for basic human needs is a significant problem throughout Haiti, although surface and ground water resources are abundant. This situation leads to increased competition for limited resources. Several of the main reasons for this situation are:

  • uneven rainfall distribution;
  • degradation of the watersheds caused by deforestation;
  • rapid growth in urban areas with demand beyond capacity;
  • poor distribution networks;
  • poor water resources management;
  • no single agency responsible for management of water ;
  • lack of adequate data needed to make informed decisions;
  • poor irrigation supply network leading to underdevelopment; 
  • lack of wastewater  treatment and solid waste disposal.

Most of the streams are relatively small and less than 100 kilometers long. With each passing year, the rivers and streams flow more like torrents and less like stable permanent rivers. The largest natural lake in the country is Étang Saumâtre has no outlet, and contains brackish water. Many of the smaller natural lakes that exist throughout the country also contain brackish water. 

ABJECT POVERTY

About 54 percent of the population lives in abject poverty. Based on 1997 estimates, the unemployment rate in a work force of approximately 3.6 million is about 38 percent.

Only 61.7% of the population have jobs but these are the working poor as many make only $3.10 per day. Women are least likely to go to school or have a job. Violence against women is common with 22.8% of women reporting abuse – what of the abuse that goes unreported? Of course the issue of “restavek” children or child slavery persists despite national and international laws. It is a socially accepted norm to sell children ages 5-15 and to make then work for no pay, to deny them the opportunity to attend school and results in children being abused both physically and sexually.

In Cite Soleil – the largest slum in Haiti is 3 square miles and has about 200-300,000 people. Most are unemployed and the vast majority are children. In Haiti 65% of the people are under 25 years old. The children live in extreme hunger and are exposed to gang violence, high risk for HIV/AIDS, no opportunity for an education, no sewer system and rat infestations. On average – nine people live in one shack.

Most people who live in the slums state their biggest fear is violence – especially for women and girls (Haugen and Boutros, 2014). In the slums, this problem is rampant; acts of violence are intentionally hidden, legal protection is non-existent and violence keeps the poor from ever escaping poverty.

Port-au-Prince

Water supply for Port-au-Prince, the most populated area in Haiti, is poor. In 1995 only about 35 percent of the nearly 2.5 million inhabitants had access to the water system. Most receive water only twice a week. The lack of service is attributed to

  • system losses associated with the age of the distribution system and theft of service, estimated at 60 percent;
  •  interruptions in the power supply to the wells and pumps; and
  •  contamination of water sources.

Over the past 10 years, heavy migration from rural areas to towns and cities has seriously affected the housing situation. Epidemics including malaria, typhoid, chronic diarrhea, and intestinal infections are caused by water contaminated by rubbish and fecal matter. Infants are especially vulnerable to these diseases, accounting for the death of up to one-third of all children before the age of five.

The Port-au-Prince municipal water system supplies water to about one-third of the population. The main sources of water for the municipal water system are 18 springs in the hills south of the city. These sources are facing several major problems that are decreasing the quality and quantity of the water entering the municipal water system. All of the springs are reported to be contaminated by biological contamination from human and solid wastes with a couple of the springs being too polluted to be used.

HERE LIES THE SOLUTION

Northern and windward slopes of mountainous areas of Dominican Republic commonly receive two to three times as much precipitation as leeward slopes of Haiti.(This accounts for the seasonal drought-like conditions of Haiti.)  Here lies the solution to our problem.

Based on the vortex or a physical phenomena of the Spiral:

 

HUG Spiraling Pipeline

How much money to solve the water crisis?

Most people are taking a serious look at the numbers within the context of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) to “reduce by half the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation by 2015.”

The World Bank offers a range of cost estimates to reach MDG goals. They estimate the cost of reaching “basic levels of coverage…in water and sanitation” to be $9 billion at the low end, and $30 billion a year for “achieving universal coverage” for water and sanitation.

The United Nations Development Program estimates the cost of meeting the MGD to be about $10 billion a year.”

A Case Study

To give you an idea of the extent of present project prices, in South Dakota, Minnesota, and Iowa, construction on a 400-mile water pipeline is about to be underway. The Lewis and Clark Rural Water System consists of five reservoirs and seven pump stations, supplying and delivering over 27.2 million gallons of water per day (1.2 m3/s) to communities within the tri-state area. The water will be extracted from a series of wells along the Missouri River and will supply over 200,000 people (at $1,800 each) with high quality drinking water. The cost of this project is estimated at about $360 million and will take 10 to 12 years to complete.

Water Transfer Privatization has Failed.

Water shortages are caused by lack of political will, institutional obstruction, greed, corruption and chains from the past.

Millions of people could have to wait years for clean water as some of the world’s largest companies pull out of developing countries because of growing doubts about privatization projects, a major UN report reveals today.

Last week Suez, one of the world’s largest water companies, said that it was now impossible for it to work in Latin America.  One of the chief executive of Suez Environment, which has major contracts in Argentina, Bolivia and Haiti, said: “We are not a political organization, but how can we do our job if the political system in countries changes its mind so often?

The world’s largest water companies are not solving the water crisis, so what should we do?

Not Privatization of Water: Public-Private Partnerships

But where does the fuel or profit come from?  It comes from Public-Private Partnerships, which introduces a meaningful private sector involvement. This can be done in at least two of the following three structural elements: design, build,  or operate, one of which must include operate. 

 Living Water Is Corporation will initiate and bring together private financing  with its associate partners.

 

LWI HUG

Once completed, the underdeveloped country will then lease the facility back to the private partner under a long-term lease.  The private partner involved in the design and construction of the infrastructure has an opportunity to earn a reasonable 10% to 15% real pre-tax equity return. That means the underdeveloped country shares in the other 85% to  90%.

How different will the HUG technology be? 

Presently,  excess fresh water is wasted as it flows into the ocean. Present technology of water transfer is limited to 80 km between pumping stations.  No one has considered the possibility of transferring fresh water through the ocean over a distance of ten times that limitation of 80 km. One can float these pipelines at a depth of 30 meters in an ocean environment, which allows one country to sell its excess water to another country over a long distance. 

WATER RESOURCES IN HAITI SOLVEDHaiti Water Solved This fresh water pipeline is extruded directly into the ocean from a barge or from a sea shore without any welding required.

Haiti Water Solved

 

WATER RESOURCES IN HAITI SOLVED

Water Shortages: New Patented Pipelines, SPIRAL*, a Solution?

A little known secret is that water never wants to flow in a straight line as in the case of present pipelines.  Instead, the molecules of water wants to align itself in a vortex not unlike how the water leaves your bathtub — in a whirlpool configuration. 

So the new technology simply creates an environment where the water flows in a corkscrew fashion, but at four times the speed and with little or no friction. The sides of the pipeline have similar striations as found in the rifling contours inside the barrel of a rifle.fibonacci cylinder8

 

HELPING SOLVE WORLD’S CARBON POLLUTION

New Trees are the only solution to soaking up Carbon Dioxide:

Tree Growth

A Full Scale Aquaponic Tree Nursery in Africa supported by:

  1. A Micro Hydro Electric System: no dams: HugENERGY.us
  2. An Irrigation System: NORTHydro.com
  3. A Rabbit and Fish Farm: AfriCAPITALISM.us
  4. An Agroforestry Intercrop System: LivingWaterIs.com
  5. The Charitable Arm: SunnyUp.net
  6. God’s Loveletters:  Godloveletters.com
  7. Thunder of Justice: ThunderofJustice.com
  8. Deliverance Is: DeliveranceIs.com

OUR STRATEGY

Stage 1  Today’s Tall Trees Nursery: Carbon Tax Fund 
Stage 2  Agricultural Mechanization 
Stage 3   Micro Finance & Landlord Cooperatives 
Stage 4   Irrigation in Remote Areas using kinetic energy from moving water.
Stage 5   Electricity Created in Remote Areas using moving water without the use of a dam.

 

VOODOO SPIRITUALITY

NEAR DEATH EXPERIENCEnear death experience

PROOF OF HEAVEN

proof of heaven

SEVEN BILLION TREES

LET’S DEAL WITH GLOBAL WARMING NOW!

Let us examine the 80% of allocated funds ($720 million of $900 million) of the world to other than Africa. Does this breakdown address the highest need to deal with Global Warming? It would appear that all these agencies are off the mark to “helping countries build Resilience to climate change’s impacts.“ Building this kind of Resilience is like locking the stable door after the horse has been stolen.

 What comes first? An Emission absorption solution or manufacturing of face masks for everyone.  The situation cannot be changed by improving security after a major theft. We must deal with the Security Problem first! The door (Our world as we know it) cannot be vulnerable to attack.

To correct the problem we must fix the barn door (Emission absorption Solution) or harness the horse (Reduce Emissions). Now we really must catch the horse (Solve the emission problem), but very few people (the Millennium Development Goals Achievement Fund (MDG-F) are searching for the horse. This includes all of the participants starting from the largest: UNDP, UNICEF, FAO, UNESCO, ILO, UNFPA, WFP, UNIDO, UNWOMEN, PAHO/WHO and IOM.

In the meantime, our governments are simply thinking about taxing some polluters a little and readjusting the tax to keep it neutral. Our Governments are only talking to locksmiths. In other words, they are not addressing the problem at all. (Remember: the horse has already bolted).

 Carbon Emission to be Solved

The world leaders must find a way to absorb carbon dioxide emissions that is in our atmosphere now. Trees and soils are the only way to absorb the present glut of CO2 in your world.

Presently these funds are improperly managed because they attempt to make the tax neutral by redirecting the fund for tax rebates to working families, cutting sales tax and reducing the tax on manufacturing. All this is very admirable but it doesn’t solve the high concentration of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere, which is presently causing global warming.

SEVEN BILLION TREES

The Funds to Finance Rehabilitation

There are two sources of funds based on two different methods of absorbing carbon emissions: one from biochar in soils and the other from planting of trees.

On one hectare of farm land of 500 trees:

  1. Land Degradation Neutrality (LDN) Fund for BIOCHAR IN SOILS

SEVEN BILLION TREES

LND Fund seeks to mobilize US$2 billion annually; they estimate that the average cost of land rehabilitation is $100- $150/haIn Africa, five countries have voluntary committed to LND including Algeria, Chad, Ethiopia, Namibia and Senegal.

  • 500 trees/hectare will yield 50 tons of Carbon from branches and weeds or (50 tons x ⅓) 16.7 tons of COemission absorption from the production of BIOCHAR.
  • The value of the capture of carbon in the form of Biocharis $250/year at the tax rate of $15/ton. (The LDN Fund offers $150/year based on $10/ton of carbon emissions.)

SEVEN BILLION TREES

  1. The Carbon Tax Fund for TREES: the fund can support 500 trees for a total cost of $200/year for a period of 25 years plus an initial $750:

SEVEN BILLION TREES

SEVEN BILLION TREES

  • There will be 500 trees with a NPV of $0.50/tree to $2.50/tree: at the rate of $15/ton, the Net Present Value (NPV) is $200/year.
  • Add $1.00/tree for reporting and auditing for 25 years (that’s a one-off total – not per year): $500 to be monitored by Living Water MicroFinance Inc. for 25 years.SEVEN BILLION TREES

This part of the fund will support each 1.5 acre farm that will have access to $150/year in the form of micro finance assistance complements of the Carbon Tax Fund. Each $150 will be recycled nine times for a total of $1,350.

SEVEN BILLION TREES

Carbon Tax NOT Enough

ALL THE FUNDS WILL BE DIRECTED TO THE PRODUCTION OF TREE NURSERIES IN AFRICA: $80,000/TODAY’S TALL TREE NURSERY

SEVEN BILLION TREES

SEVEN BILLION TREES

 

SOME GOVERNMENTS HAVE TREATED FORESTS GENEROUSLY

Farmers who plant trees get generous payments for 15 years. The rate in England is £1.28 ($1.72) per tree, plus grants for fences and gates.

With perhaps 20 years to go before conifers are harvested, they often sell to pension funds and other investors.

NEAR-DEATH EXPERIENCES

PROOF OF HEAVEN